Having your pet properly tagged and microchipped offers peace of mind should your furry friend go missing.

It's a pet parent's worst nightmare to have their pet go missing. Despite circling the block, and enlisting neighbors to help in the search, you can’t track them down. You hope to never find yourself in this position but, if you do, having your pet properly tagged and microchipped is the best way to increase the chance that you are reunited.

Why both an ID tag and microchip?

Having both forms of identification helps ensure that whoever finds your pet will be able to get in touch with you, whatever the circumstance might be. A neighbor can easily read a collar tag and, if nearby, can return your pet quickly. Should your pet go missing when they are not wearing their collar, a microchip provides a back up identification method. In the event that your pet is stolen with the intention of re-sale, a microchip offers irrefutable proof of your ownership.

Even if you have an indoor pet, having proper identification is crucial in case of an emergency.

What is a microchip?

A microchip is a little chip inserted under your pet’s skin. It is minimally painful, and can be completed as part of a routine vet visit. Many animal shelters will also complete the pet’s microchipping prior to placing them up for adoption. And, since the microchip lasts for life, once inserted you don’t need to worry about it again.

Once your pet is microchipped, be sure to register the microchip (your vet or shelter can provide information about registration), and then be sure to keep your contact information up-to-date. Once inserted and registered, the microchip can be scanned to retrieve your contact information by shelters, animal control agencies and most veterinary offices.

Pet ID tags and microchipping are an easy, inexpensive way to help protect your pet. It is also your pet’s best chance of being reunited with you should they go missing. If you have further questions, or are interested in microchipping your pet, visit 24PetWatch.com or speak with your veterinarian.